TIN Checking

Tax ID Verification Service
Avoid filing 1099 Forms with TIN errors.

tin checking add-on services

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Related Questions


TIN Match (Taxpayer Identification Number Matching) is a service where we match the taxpayer identification number (EIN or SSN) and name for 1099 vendors with the IRS records. It helps in identifying any potential errors in vendors' names or tax id before filing 1099 forms.


To verify TIN using our service, select the TIN match option at the time of check out. That is all you need to do. We then verify the TIN with the IRS and report any errors to you, allowing you to fix the mistakes before filing 1099 forms.


There could be many reasons for the TIN and not to not math. Most likely there is a typo in the name or TIN, the name of the person has changed. The vendor has used their name with their business tax id or vice versa. Sometimes the vendors use their DBA (Doing Business As) name instead of their legal entity name. The IRS only recognizes the legal entity name.


The TIN Match cost starts at $1.00 per TIN match request. The more forms you have, the better volume discount your get. Check out our TIN match pricing here.


TIN is the tax identification number of the vendor receiving the 1099 form. It could be the Employer Identification Number (EIN) or the Social Security Number (SSN) of the vendor.


The TIN verification process is used to verify vendors' tax ID. However, please note that you can only use the TIN matching service for the 1099 filing purposes. TIN matching is not allowed for any other purpose. Payers having reportable payments subject to the backup withholding provisions are allowed to verify tax ID.


If the SSN is wrong, you must file a correction form to fix the error. The IRS matches the name on the 1099 form with the tax ID (SSN or EIN), and if they don't match the IRS records, the form is flagged. Type 2 correction is needed to fix errors in SSNs. Check out the details to see more information on Type 2 corrections. You must file the correction with the IRS as well as provide a corrected copy to your recipient.


With our optional TIN Check Service, we can verify that the Taxpayer Identification Numbers (TIN) used in your forms are correct. We match the name and tax id combination of the vendor with IRS records. A TIN can be either a Social Security Number (SSN) or an Employer Identification Number (EIN).


It is a good practice to collect Tax Id from vendors on form W-9 before making any payments. A vendor is supposed to provide their TIN with businesses they work with. If the vendor is not registered as a business, their Social Security Number (SSN) is used.


The main difference between the TIN and EIN is that an EIN is used for identifying companies. In contrast, a TIN is used for identifying taxable individuals in the U.S. While both are used for reporting and identifying purposes, the difference lies in the scenarios in which a particular number can be used.


Not really. For the IRS, as long as the number is a valid nine-digit number, it is not important how it is formatted. EIN is formatted like XX-XXXXXXX whereas SSN is formatted as XXX-XX-XXXX. This difference in formatting is only useful when printing the TIN.


A tax identification number of the vendor is required filed on 1099 form. TIN is the only way the IRS determines the tax liability of the recipient of the 1099 form.


Yes, using our website eFile360.com, you can verify TINs online. When you submit your 1099 forms, you can select the option TIN check service, and we would verify TIN for your vendors.


The Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) Matching Program is a free web-based tool offered by the IRS through e-services and was established for payers of reportable payments subject to the backup withholding provisions of section 3406 of the Internal Revenue Code.


It is possible to file 1099s without the payee's tax ID. You can use all 0s in place of tax ID. Generally, for missing or incorrect tax Ids reported on 1099, the IRS issues CP2100 notices instructing you to initiate a TIN request from your vendor. To comply, it is a good practice to collect TIN information form your vendors ahead of time.


"TIN" – means the taxpayer identification number that a payee is required to furnish to a payor. The TIN may be an Employer Identification Number (EIN), a Social Security Number (SSN), or an Internal Revenue Service Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN).


Some independent contractors (a type of sole proprietor) use an Employer Identification Number rather than their Social Security number to safeguard against identity theft. Sole proprietors sometimes use an EIN to show their status as independent contractors rather than employees.


As a payer, when you file 1099 with incorrect TIN (EIN or SSN), the IRS issues you CP2100 or CP2100A notice that tells you that you may be responsible for backup withholding. That means next time you make any payments to the vendor identified, you are required to withhold a certain percentage from the money you pay to the vendor and pay to the IRS.


If your payee refuses to provide you their TIN, you should begin backup withholding immediately on any reportable payments. You are required to request TIN from the vendor on an annual basis. You should backup withhold until you receive a TIN.


Suppose you have received a CP2100 or CP2100A notice from the IRS for incorrect or missing TIN on a 1099 form. You should send B Notice to your payee requesting their TIN information. If you have not started backup withholding, begin to do so immediately and continue until you receive a TIN.


A "B" Notice is a backup withholding notice that you send to your payee if they have not provided you their TIN. You must send the "B" Notice and a Form W-9 to your payee after receiving the CP2100 or CP2100A Notice for soliciting a correct Name/TIN combination.


You must file correction forms immediately to correct the TIN on the 1099 form. Check out our corrections filing process for 1099 forms.